Quiz: What Paper Size?

Here’s another math problem inspired by real life! Each correct answer could earn you five dollars ($5) off any of our products or services (to redeem in person, just print and show your certificate).  Good luck!

You are only allowed one try and have already submitted your quiz.

What's Wrong With This Picture (Version 2)?

It has been almost sixteen months since I submitted my last suspicious photographannouced and I just don’t have enough material to make this a regular feature, but here we go. Nancy took this picture here in Florida. I made a simple change (and cleaned it up just a bit).  So what is wrong here?

an altered sunrise photo

All comments and guesses are welcome. You have at least two weeks to figure it out and respond but don’t dilly dally. Good luck!

Nancy's Photos Are In Book About Bees

Last updated on January 6th, 2020 at 04:07 pm

Our friend, April Kirkendoll, just finished a book about beekeeping, “Thinking Outside The Box”, and included several of Nancy’s photographs (which in this case were created specifically for this project with April’s beehives).

As you may remember, we introduced April in the Afterword of our blog post Why You Haven’t Seen Any Painted Buntings three years ago. Nancy happens to have some experience with honey beesabout, having kept conventional beehives for several years in South Miami. The two of them have discussed and practiced the hobby together on a number of occasions.

April has done extensive research and experimenting on topbar beehives, a different approach to beekeeping. I’ve only read four chapters so far so I can’t yet give a full review or endorsement, but I really like what I’ve read. Just from her contribution to “Why You Haven’t Seen Any Painted Buntings”, you can see she has a less formal, easy to read style with some humor that still gives more depth than you are likely to find in other sources.

You can purchase “Thinking Outside The Box” (as well as her other books) from Amazon, or you can probably get a better price directly from her website (Lysmata Publishing). As I’ve mentioned before, we receive no consideration (i.e. money) for our remarks or from your purchases. Nonetheless, it is time to update our current longterm promotion (originally described in the last note in the Postscript of “Why You Haven’t Seen Any Painted Buntings”).

New Offer

If you bring your copy of any book by either April Kirkendoll or Brian Rapoza to our booth, we will give you four dollars ($4) off of any purchase. If you can show any of Nancy’s photographs in those books, we will give you another dollar ($1) off.

We are looking forward to seeing you at an art festival in your area. To find out where and when that might be, you can check out our schedule as it develops here.

Our Second Biannual Caption Contest

OK, so it’s actually been almost 27 months since our first caption contestprevious. The photograph this time is not part of our regular collection, nor will it ever be, most likely. Nancy took this picture on our trip with Natural Habitat Adventures to Uganda and Rwanda in 2015 to photograph mountain gorillasdetails. As you can see, we found some. We are just starting to process those pictures now.

Bruce and silverback
Your caption could be here

This shot was taken at Volcanoes National Park in Rwanda. We were told that we weren’t supposed to get within seven meters (23 feet) of a gorilla on this hike. I’m as far off the trail (which goes off to your left) as I can get, unlike the other three gentlemen, and I’m wishing I had a wider lens. The other three managed to get out of the silverback’s way just after this photo was taken, and we all lived happily ever after.

The winner of this contest will get ten dollars off any print or service of Bee Happy Graphics. Here’s how the contest will work:

  • For at least the next three weeks, you can enter your caption idea into the comments of this article below.
  • I will announce the close of the competition and the beginning of the voting process in another comment to this blog post. I may have a plug-in for that by then and will explain the voting process in that same comment.
  • At least two weeks after that last announcement a winner will be announced. If any entry has three or more votes, the one with the most votes will be the winner. If no entry has that many votes, then I will take an informal survey among my closest family and friends, and pick the winner. The decision of the judges (as defined above) is final. This prize may be combined with other promotions.

Good luck, and let the contest begin!

Our Newest Teacher’s Poster, Pupating Monarch, Is Ready

Last updated on December 17th, 2018 at 11:35 am

Less than four months after creating our “Pupating Monarch” imageblog, the new posters are ready. We first mentioned these four years ago in Teacher’s Special – Laminated Poster Of “Emerging Monarch” Is Ready!. They are the same size, specifications, and price as our original poster ($15 for 17″ by 28″ signed poster, laminated on both sides).  Like the “Emerging Monarch” poster, they can’t be displayed in our booth during art festivals so you may have to ask for them (or you can contact us directly anytime and we will mail them).

My Answer To “What’s Wrong With This Picture”

Last updated on December 13th, 2019 at 12:27 pm

Background

Several days ago, I showed a photograph and asked: “What’s Wrong With This Picture”.  Here is more information.

Sideways Moon (overview)

Nancy took this overview a minute later. Both were taken in March 2016, while we were on a trip to Antarctica. The mountains (and snow) in the first picture should have told you “we’re not in Kansas (or Florida), anymore.”video The moon in both pictures is waxing (growing) gibbous (more than half full), meaning the full moon would be five days later. Those are Gentoo penguins you see in this picture. She took these photos on the way back to the ship after our morning excursion, as I remember.

My Answers

Although I was a bit surprised nobody mentioned that the moon, as the subject of the first picture, was too centered, thus violating the rule of thirds, one member of my camera club did think the image confusing because she wasn’t sure what the subject was.  That was a completely valid point and was probably why Nancy had to be coaxed into taking that picture.    The overview shown above might be better in that respect, but here is why I (the technical support guy) found the image interesting:

The moon and the sun follow similar paths across the sky and the lighted part of the moon always points directly toward the sun along that path.  Every time I’ve ever seen the moon just above the horizon, it was pointing almost straight up (or down).  The moon in these two pictures is pointing to the left, a difference of almost 90° from my normal.

The mountains give almost no locational clue, but the snow at sea level tells you that we are not that close to the equator and the penguins tell us which hemisphere we are in (the specific species will narrow down the possible locations even further).  The angle of the moon does the best job, however, of narrowing the geographical possibilities – showing that we were close to the (Ant)arctic Circle.

To get the same effect with Photoshop wouldn’t be that hard, but would take more than just cropping.  And this effect doesn’t fall in the impossible range, like a star between the tips of a crescent moon, or maybe either type of eclipse during the quarter moon, so it is unlikely to be found in a unicorn shot or the like.  It is just a very unusual perspective that I wanted to appreciate for what it was and share with my friends.

By the way, this is the third article (set) I’ve published in the last three weeks involving the moon.  But fear not, I’m ready to move on.  Thank you for listening.

What’s Wrong With This Picture?

Last updated on December 13th, 2019 at 12:21 pm

This barely retouched picture (not even cropped – only overcoming camera sensor limitations), which Nancy took a while back (at my request), shows something that most people never see.  Another good question might be “What aspect of this photograph gives the best clue about where it was taken?”

Sideways Moon (closeup)
There may be more than one correct answer to these questions.  I’ll have my answers in two weeks. Stay tuned!