Our Newest Teacher’s Poster, Pupating Monarch, Is Ready

Less than four months after creating our “Pupating Monarch” imageblog, the new posters are ready. We first mentioned these four years ago in Teacher’s Special – Laminated Poster Of “Emerging Monarch” Is Ready!. They are the same size, specifications, and price as our original poster ($15 for 17″ by 28″ signed poster, laminated on both sides).  Like the “Emerging Monarch” poster, they can’t be displayed in our booth during art festivals so you may have to ask for them (or you can contact us directly anytime and we will mail them).

We Have A Winner!

Three months ago, I invited you to critique my new homepage and offered a rewardblog. The offer has closed and the results are in. But first, a recap. We received twenty suggestions from six people. Each suggestion received three virtual tickets. We received no votes of preference between the new and the old homepage. Each of those would have received one ticket. While some of the questions in the original post were not addressed, and some of the suggestions apply to the other parts of our website beyond the scope of this contest (which will still be considered in my next round of changes), half of our commenters thought the slideshow needed to be larger and more prominent, with more features. While two commenters didn’t like the black background and bright fonts, one (with vision problems) did, so now I need to explore how to make the site more appealing to all viewers. The suggested larger font might help. Some viewers wanted an easier but more comprehensive menu system. These were the suggestions that received multiple votes. The other suggestions were no less valid, but this is only a summary, so feel free to check them out in the comment section of the original post referenced above. While I may not be able to make all the changes, I will be working on this project over the summer. Stay tuned.

Not surprisingly, the winner was the one who made the most suggestions. Robert Sullivan received ten dollars off any print, either one of Nancy’s or his own (you can see his work at www.robertsullivanphotography.com). This award is transferable and may be combined with any other awards and promotions. There is no time limit. Congratulations, Robert, and thanks for your help. I would also like to thank our other contributors.

For the fishermen or naturalists among you, the next contest is already underway. Check out our last blog post, Name This Fish. And I still have a math question which I may get to by the end of the summer. Don’t go away.

Name This Fish

We mention on our webpage Sandhills On A Stroll (and possibly other places) how we learn from our visitors. We also have in our booth a 37″ by 68″ canvas print of our Osprey Family image. At the latest Melbourne Art Festival a controversy about the identity of the fish in that Osprey image was renewed.

Identify fish in "Osprey Family" image
The fish in “Osprey Family” image.

When she got the image, Nancy knew the fish wasn’t a mullet, which is a common osprey meal, but thought it was a yellow-tailed snapper (and may have been a bit envious). The problem with having an image that is so good (and detailed) is that your story has to be just as good. Shortly after hanging the large canvas version in our booth a ‘real fisherman’ (we consider ourselves amateurs) pointed to the faint yellow stripes on the tail and said the fish was not a snapper, but a grunt. I remembered that grunts had stripes and thought the issue was settled.

In Melbourne just recently, I was recounting this history as another example of how we learn from our guests, and another gentleman told us that wasn’t a grunt; it was a menhaden. Several other identifications followed for the rest of the weekend.

So now I want to use one of my “lifelines” and “ask the audience” (as on the game show “Who Wants To Be A Millionaire”). Here are your choices (in the order we received them):

  1. mullet
  2. yellow-tailed snapper
  3. grunt (give the specific species)
  4. menhaden
  5. lane snapper
  6. pinfish
  7. Bermuda chub
  8. other (must tell species to receive credit)

Vote with a comment to this post before June 1, 2018. Up to three winners will be randomly selected from the entries with the correct answer.

To see the Note click here.To hide the Note click here.
The correct answer will be determined with insight from contributors and scientific evidence available from the image. If a definitive answer cannot be found by June 1st, the answer with the greatest number of votes will prevail.

Winners will receive ten dollars off of any print (either Nancy’s or your own). Prizes may be combined with other promotions or coupons. Entrants need not be present to win.  Good luck!

Check Out A New Home Page (And Win A Prize)

I started a live test of a new Bee Happy Graphics home page, and I’d like your comments. Comments on such things as “Is the slide show at the bottom much help?” or “Is there some other criterion besides subject, location, and primary color that one might use to find images?”. Are the priorities correct? Is it effective? Is there something else that should be here or is important information missing? Can you get to the good pages quick enough from here? Of course, there are still other corrections and possible improvements to the whole website pending, like fixing the menu system for smartphones, etc, but I hope those will come soon enough; they are not part of this test.

All of the comments with viable suggestions for improvement will receive three (virtual) tickets to a drawing for ten dollars off any print (either Nancy’s image or your own). All other comments stating a preference for either the old or new page will receive one ticket. For comparison purposes (and possible reinstatement), the old page can be found here. The drawing will be held sometime after March 11, 2018. You need not be present to win.  This reward may be combined with other promotions.

A Second Practical Mat(h) Problem

OK, here’s another problem inspired by matting pictures.  Suppose you have an image that you want to put in a standard 16″ by 20″ mat.  You can print the image any size, but want to keep the original 2:3 aspect ratio (meaning that the length will always be 50% longer than the width so you won’t lose any of the image due to cropping).  You want the mat to be the same width on all four sides.  Although standard mats overlap the image by 1/4″, this is not a standard hole so I like to use a 1/8″ overlap (which would be riskier with borderless prints).  The first question is “How large should you print the picture?”  Mathematically, there is only one correct answer to this question.  Once you figure it out, how wide should I cut the mat (where do I set the mat guide on the mat cutter)?

Another Mat Problem
Another Mat Problem

The Prize

Email your answer to blogger@BeeHappyGraphics.com.  The first three correct answers will receive $7 off any print and another $7 off if you choose to frame (or gallery-wrap) the image. As before, I will publish some responses, but obviously not immediately. So that nobody dies from the suspense, we will put a one-month deadline on this offer. Prizes may be redeemed any time after the winners are announced.  Good luck!

Contest: Come Up With Best Caption

We will give another seven-dollar discount on any print (either Nancy’s or yours) on any medium to the person who comes up with the best caption to the below picture. Since this is the first time we’ve ever tried this, I’m not sure of the best procedure, but here’s my plan:

We will accept caption ideas for one month; just enter your caption in a comment to this blog. Then, in another comment to the blog, I will start the voting – one vote per person – just tell me your choice in another comment. After two more weeks, if any entry has three or more votes, the one with the most votes will be the winner. If no entry has that many votes, then I will take an informal survey among my closest family and friends, and pick the winner. The decision of the judges (as defined above) is final and will be published in yet another comment to the blog.

Three Polar Bears
Three Polar Bears

This picture of three polar bears was taken in Churchill, Canada a few years back, and information about it can be found at our “Three Polar Bears” web page. As I mentioned in the description at our “Scouting Polar Bear” page, the polar bears lose weight while they are waiting around Churchill. I envision the one bear saying “Hey, Fred, you’re looking a little light there”, to which the other might reply “Of course! I haven’t found a photographer in weeks”. I shared that in the hopes of stimulating your creativity; if instead, I stifled your creativity, that would be bad – please let me know.

Good luck, and let the contest begin!

A Simple Mat(h) Problem

Interesting math problems have always seemed to jump out of the woodwork at me. Here’s a simple geometry problem inspired by mat cutting. You don’t need a mat cutter or mat cutting experience to solve this problem, however.

Starting with a regular 40″ by 60″ foam board, a 23″ (by 40″) slice had already been removed for another project (shown as the large black-hashed area on the left edge of the illustration). In the blue dashed lines of the illustration, I drew simple plans to cut out four standard 16″ by 20″ pieces, but then discovered that there were problems along the top edge requiring me to remove a one-inch strip (shown with red hash marks), leaving a piece of foam board 39″ high by 37″ wide.

Illustration for Mat(h) problemThe question is “How many 16″ by 20″ pieces can I still get out of this remaining foam board?”. One would make the cuts on their mat cutter with a razor-like blade, so you don’t have to worry about a kerf (the extra material removed by the width of the saw blade).

The seven best answers will receive $7 off any print and another $7 off if you choose to frame (or gallery-wrap) the image. I will publish some responses, but obviously not immediately. So that nobody dies from the suspense, we will put a two-month deadline on this offer. Prizes may be redeemed any time afterwards.  Good luck!