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Applied math Post-processing Printing & Framing

How To Make Your Beveled Edges Look Like A Continuation Of Your Image

When describing our canvas gallery-wrap optionslink, we mention that the technique we use, the digital stretch wrap, creates an optical illusion. For any given amount of stretch, there is a particular “illusion angle” at which the sides look like an unstretched and uncompressed continuation of the frontthe math. Figure 1 shows that angle for various […]

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Applied math Printing & Framing

Using Multiple Moulding Widths In One Frame

revised 6/1/2020 In this article, the first of the “Weird Wood” seriesintro, we show how to build a picture frame using four strips of moulding that aren’t all the same width. Although Figure 1 uses a different width for each piece of moulding, we used three different sizes in our test frames (only because I […]

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Applied math Printing & Framing

Comments on Mat(h) Solution

I posted our first Simple Mat(h) Problem on April 27, 2017, and Jim Farrington submitted a solution a couple of weeks later. Here are a few more comments on the problem that I published (but in the wrong place). Although the mat cutter has no kerf, at the start of the cut the blade does […]

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Applied math Printing & Framing

Another Method For Adjusting A Logan Sander

To download a printable version of this article (AdjustingSander.pdf), click here We have a Logan Precision Sander Elite Model F200-2 disk sander. It improves our picture frame miters to a “perfect 45°” after cutting the moulding to size on our miter saw. To maintain such perfection requires due diligence and occasional adjustment. How Do You […]

Categories
Applied math Post-processing

An Optical Illusion

When we do the gallery wrap on our canvas prints, I usually take just a tad along the edge of the image and digitally stretch it to several times its original width to wrap around the edge of the frame. When we do that stretching, we set up an optical illusion. When the image is […]