Leafy Sea Dragon Added To Website

This image has been available in our booth for about a year.

Leafy Sea Dragon
Leafy Sea Dragon

Nancy took this picture at the Georgia Aquarium in Atlanta. Leafy sea dragons live in the coastal waters all along the southern edge of Australia. They rely on camouflage for protection. Like seahorses, the males care for the eggs. After they hatch the young sea dragons are on their own. They grow to about ten inches. In the wild, only 5% live to maturity. In captivity, the survival rate just went above zero for the first time. Sea Dragons have been protected by the Australian government since the early 1990s.

For more information (and a larger picture), check out our website.

Would “Pineland Fog” Look As Beautiful In Black And White?

A visitor asks about a black & white version of Pineland Fog.

Linda, a visitor to our booth at the Tamarac Art Festival, asked:

You have a piece titled “Pineland Fog.” Would it look as beautiful in black and white? Or would the sunrise not be appreciated in B & W?  Thanks for your insight.

We said

As you put it, we don’t think the sunrise would be fully appreciated in black & white. Although it seems almost like a monochrome already, the warm glow of the sun is very appealing and draws you into the picture (and Bruce doesn’t think the red-yellowish to blue-grayish gradient from bottom to top is that bad either).

But you can check it out yourself.

Pineland Fog (black & white version)
Pineland Fog (black & white version)

For comparison purposes, the original is at Pineland Fog

We actually think it is very nice in B & W. A metallic paper might go well here. We just like the original better.

But we would really like to hear your opinion.

Check Out Our Ghost Orchid Picture

I just added our Ghost Orchid picture to the website.

Ghost Orchid
Ghost Orchid

This photograph was taken in early July. Ghost Orchids bloom in the peak of mosquito season. We were wading in water just below our waist. Tanin in the water makes water visibility almost zero. With her camera equipment just inches from the water surface, Nancy couldn’t afford to trip over the abundant cypress knees or step in a solution hole. Water moccasins and alligators were also well represented.

Dendrophylax lindenii, which is in the Vandeae family, is a leafless perennial epiphyte native to Florida, Cuba, and the Bahamas. It is found in swampy forests. It is endangered, with only about 2,000 remaining in Florida. Cultivation is nearly impossible, and wild-caught orchids die within a year (and yet it suffers from heavy poaching). The Ghost Orchid does not flower reliably. The giant sphinx moth, the only insect with a long enough proboscis, pollinates the Ghost Orchid at night.

For more information (and a larger picture), check out our website.

Our “New” Lady Slipper Orchid Picture

Another beautiful picture that I just added to the web site (even though it has been available in our booth for two years now) is the Lady Slipper Orchid.

Lady Slipper Orchid
Lady Slipper Orchid

Paphiopedilum vanguard is a hybrid that was first produced in 1921 from two other members of the genus. All members of that genus come from southeast Asia. This specimen was produced by Terry Glancy, owner of Pine Ridge Orchids in Homestead, Florida.

There are twelve species of lady slippers native to the U.S, all in the genus Cypripedium.

For more information (and a larger picture), check out our website.

Teacher’s Poster Of “Emerging Monarch” Is Ready!

Nancy & I were both teachers and know that teachers often have to pay for school supplies out of their own pocket.  And since we noticed that “Emerging Monarch” seemed to be a magnet to elementary teachers who taught about the life cycle of Monarch butterflies in their class, we promised a while back that we would make an affordable poster of that image just for them.  We are happy to say that we’ve finally finished that promise.  A 17″ by 28″ signed poster, laminated on both sides, is now available to teachers only for fifteen dollars, including tax.  We are still researching shipping options, but once we finish we will contact everybody that has given us their e-mail address for that purpose.  Any other teachers who would like more information can contact us, as described on our website.  Be prepared to prove teacher status.

Similar projects still under consideration include a poster for the transition from caterpillar (larva) to chrysalis (pupa), for which we’ve taken the photographs but still need to process them, and for the complete “Life Cycle of Monarch Butterfly“, which we need to update with our new information. Stay tuned!

Cape Florida Lighthouse

Here’s another lighthouse picture that I forgot to mention. Nancy was born and raised in Miami, and the Cape Florida Light on the south tip of Key Biscayne has a special place in her heart. Back in the day, it was red because decades of neglect had allowed Atlantic storms to sandblast all the white paint off of the bricks. And before the state bought the property in 1966 (and later turned it into Bill Baggs Cape Florida State Park), one would have to walk down the beach from Crandon Park to reach it. It was finally repainted during the restoration of the mid-1990s (at which point many native Miamians, for whom the bricks were all they had ever seen, thought the restorers were ruining their lighthouse).

Cape Florida Lighthouse
Cape Florida Lighthouse. Nancy took this picture from the beach north of the light on a late afternoon in 2010.

Nancy took this picture from the beach north of the lighthouse late one afternoon in 2010. The original image was in color. This image was just added to our collection late in 2014. We give just a little more of the lighthouse’s rich history on our www.BeeHappyGraphics.com website.

Jupiter Inlet Lighthouse

Our website has long been due for an update (and even routine maintenance), and now there are two people working on it (both of whom seem to have a full plate of other responsibilities). I just counted eight of Nancy’s photographs that weren’t yet even listed on the site yet. That is what I’m chipping away at now. I have finished with “Osprey Family”, which I introduced in an earlier post* and is Nancy’s most recent addition to our collection. Now I’m going to tell you about “Jupiter Inlet Lighthouse”.

Jupiter Inlet Lighthouse
Jupiter Inlet Lighthouse under a full moon.

We were in Jupiter for the ArtiGras Fine Arts Festival* the weekend of a full moon, so after setting up for the show we did some exploring and came upon the Jupiter Inlet Lighthouse. We couldn’t find a suitable perspective from the lighthouse grounds (the lighthouse was on a small mound with trees around it), so took this picture from the drawbridge on US-1 over the Loxahatchee River. The sidewalk on the east side of this 1958 bridge is narrow, and because of the longer exposure necessary for a night shot (⅛ second), the camera was on a tripod, but when the front two legs of the tripod were against the edge, the back leg was in the street and our butts were in traffic. The bridge tender looked at us as if we were crazy. Automobile traffic would rattle the bridge, ruining our shot, so we needed the unsynchronized traffic lights on both sides of the bridge to be red together for at least twenty seconds so we could let the traffic clear the bridge and then compose our shot. While we were waiting, the moon was trying to exit the scene more quickly than most non-astronomers realize. We also needed the light’s beam to be in a convenient location (It gives two flashes every 30 seconds, meaning that during the twenty second period of common red described above, it might not even show). Eventually (with a little divine help) everything came together, we got the shot, and lived happily ever after – but until then there were some long tense moments.