We’ll Be At Artfest In The Pines mid-March

This 22nd annual art festival will be held at the Charles F. Dodge City Center in Pembroke Pines from 10 am to 5 pm on both Saturday, March 14, and Sunday.


Besides more than a hundred artists, there will be pop-up art, entertainment, food, art demonstrations, student art competition, and more for the expected five thousand visitors. For more information, visit their website (www.ppines.com/1240/ArtFest-in-the-Pines).

This will be our fourth time at this festival. Last year Nancy received First Place in Photographyannounced, but did much worseblog the year before. Come on out and see what happens this time.

Suncoast Arts Fest Is The Weekend Of January 18

We have been accepted into this 15th annual art festival, which will be open from 10 am to 6 pm on Saturday, January 18, 2020, and 11 to 6 on Sunday. It will be at The Shops at Wiregrass (28211 Paseo Drive), at the northeast corner of FL-56 and Bruce B Downs Blvd, 2.4 miles east of I-75 Exit 275 in Wesley Chapel.


The promoters, Fine Arts of the Suncoast, are expecting between 80,000 and 100,000 visitors to over 130 artists. There will also be live entertainment and free activities for kids. Admission is free. For more information, as it becomes available, you can try suncoastartsfest.com.

We were in this festival for the first time in 2016blog. We were scheduled to participate in 2018, but Nancy had back problemsannounced.

Introducing “Royal Terns”

A couple of days after an art festival in Cedar Key two-and-a-half years ago, Nancy took this photograph from the bow of our new canoe on the north end of Seahorse Key before making the return trip to Cedar Key. Although the weather had been good all day, that trip did not finish well. You can read about that on our “new” webpage for the image (that webpage is now six months old).

A flock of royal terns landing

Earlier on that canoe trip. we took Gigapan images of downtown Cedar Key from Atsena Otie Key before moving on to Seahorse Key to get a Gigapan of the lighthouse. I upgraded our computerspecs this summer to make our Gigapan work faster, and hope to get to those images next month. Stay tuned.

“Oak Tree Graveyard” – Our First Night Photograph

Last updated on December 2nd, 2019 at 09:31 pm

When we discovered Big Talbot Island State Parkwebsite north of Jacksonville one morning toward the end of April, 2010, Nancy saw Boneyard Beach and decided we needed to come back late in the afternoon for further investigation.  The elevation for most of the tree-clad island is about twenty feet.  Atlantic storms over the millennia have eroded the bluff to the beach and continue to knock trees down to the beach.  We returned while it was still light, worked our way down to the beach and took “Trees In Their Twilight” just a few minutes after sunset.  The camera was on a tripod for the 0.8-second exposure.

Since we expected a near-full moon to rise within the hour, we stayed around and took “Oak Tree Graveyard” less than an hour later, one third of the way through nautical twilightdefinition.  It was so dark we needed a flashlight to change the settings on the camera.  That picture took a 65-second exposure (about 8,000 times as long as your average selfie), which gave the sensor a chance to pick up light you didn’t even know was there.

To see the Note click here.To hide the Note click here.
This is the one area that the sensor is better than your eye. As I mention in Limitations You Should Know About Your Digital Camera (Or Phone)!, your brain doesn’t benefit from staring at something longer than 15 secondssource.


During that 65 seconds, I took our little LED flashlight (so as not to overpower the almost non-existent ambient light) and shined the light back and forth over those nearest three trees in the foreground.  I recall “painting with light” like this the whole 65 seconds, but Nancy distinctly remembers stopping after fifteen seconds 😕.  If you sweep slowly to cover the target in one pass, you might miss a spot. Or if you linger too long in one area, you will create a “hot” spot.  I recommend sweeping faster and making as many passes as you can to take advantage of the averaging effect.

What amazed me when the image finally appeared on the back of the camera after the shutter closed, was that the orange glow was still there. We’ve since gained more experience with night photography (for example, see Nautical Twilight In The Glades, Seven-mile Bridge At Twilight, Midnight In The Pinelands). Now we know that there are enough photonsdefined bouncing around at even the darkest hour so that if you left your shutter open long enough you could make it look like a bright overcast day (there would be nothing casting a shadow). At midnight, the light level could be about 1/160th that of “Oak Tree Graveyard”, meaning you would have to increase the exposure time, aperture, and/or ISO to gain over seven f-stops to get its sky to that same level of brightness. But the horizon would be blue again by then because the orange glow only lasts an hour or two, depending on atmospheric conditions.

Epilogue

After getting “Oak Tree Graveyard”, we headed back up the bluff and back along the trail to the van. In an open area in the woods along the way, we saw an unbelievable firefly display as we have never seen before (or since), but were too tired to stop for pictures. Nancy has been kicking herself about that decision ever since.

Delray Is Out, Cedar Key Is In

Back in September, we announcedblog that we were accepted into the Delray Affair the first weekend of next April. The promoters had moved the festival dates earlier to avoid Easter. Because of circumstances beyond their control, the promoters of Cedar Key then moved the Old Florida Celebration of the Arts later to the same weekend. These are both great festivals, but because we received an award from Cedar Keyannounced, we were automatically invited to return – an offer we could not refuse.

So on Saturday, April 4, 2020, from 10 am to 5 pm and Sunday from 10 to 4 pm, we will be in Cedar Key. They are expecting 18,000 visitors. The festival will again be along historic 2nd Street.  This is our third time at this event.


Besides the 120 artists, there will also be artist demonstrations, children’s activities, and seafood & homemade goodies. For more information as it becomes available, check out their website (www.cedarkeyartsfestival.com).

To see the Note click here.To hide the Note click here.
As I mentioned in an earlier postblog, “we talk constantly to visitors about Nancy’s work, as well as photography in general and wildlife, and other related topics – her forty years as a teacher are clearly evident. And yet we were not prepared for a demonstration and did not volunteer. The truth is I have no idea how to demonstrate what we do. If you have any ideas about this, like what you would like to see demonstrated, I’d like to hear them.“.

That offer still stands.

 

To see the Note click here.To hide the Note click here.
For their picture of Nancy, go to Past Festivals (on their vertical menu) ⇒ 2019, or for the larger version, go to their Photo & Video Gallery.  It will be the ninth photo in the slideshow (or sixth little circle from the right).

Nancy Gets Merit Award At Temple Terrace

There were forty-five artists participating in this festival. In addition to the Best of Show, three awards were given in each of four categories. We were in the Photography & Mixed Media/Collage category, which included five photographers and two mixed media specialists. The Robert Woodard Award (which Nancy received in 2012blog) was the top prize in this category and went to Timothy Hall.

To see the Note click here.To hide the Note click here.
Timothy’s Facebook pagelink is better than his websitelink, but it is still out of date. The best example that I could find of his more recent work is here.

Although non-rectangular quadrilateral (four-sided) frames aren’t part of the plans for my ongoing “Weird Wood” seriesPart 1, we could discuss them later if that material isn’t adequately covered elsewhere.


The Merit Award was the third award for each category. One of the mixed media specialists came in second. We are always happy to receive a little recognition.

Gray Wolves – The Image

Last updated on November 15th, 2019 at 09:19 pm

Last month, I promised to introduce you to a few of our newer images that had been overlookedblog. Today’s image is “Gray Wolves”, which was added to our collection at the very end of last December. We photographed these wolves in June 2006 in Golden, British Columbia. You can find more information on our Gray Wolves image webpage.

Gray Wolves